How to enjoy your amateur radio license
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How to enjoy your amateur radio license an operator"s manual by Gibson, Stephen W.

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Published by Prentice Hall in Englewood Cliffs, NJ .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Radio -- Amateurs" manuals.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementStephen W. Gibson.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTK9956 .G49 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 164 p. :
Number of Pages164
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2405011M
ISBN 100130237485
LC Control Number87035707
OCLC/WorldCa17300372

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The Fast Track to Your General Class Ham Radio License: Comprehensive preparation for all FCC General Class Exam Questions July 1, until J (Fast Track Ham License Series, Book 2) Michael Burnette/5().   Technician Class [Gordon West, WB6NOA, Eric J. Nichols, KL7AJ, Pete Trotter, KB9SMG, Karin Thompson, K0RTX, Jim Massara, N2EST] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Technician Class/5().   Getting an Amateur Radio license in the US is as easy as getting a driver's license; Morse Code is no longer required. "Hams" enjoy communicating with each other using various types of radio signals, like voice, digital modes with computers, and even Morse code, and may provide essential communication services during emergencies or special events. Others enjoy talking to people across the country and around the globe, participating in local contests and building experiments. The ARRL Ham Radio License Manual will guide you as you get started in the hobby–as you select your equipment, set-up your first station and make your first contact. Use this book to study for your license exam/5().

This seventh edition of ARRL’s Tech Q & A is your authoritative guide to every question in the Technician (Element 2) question pool – everything you need to ace your first Amateur Radio license exam! Using ARRL’s Tech Q & A is the best way to review for the exam with confidence. Discover the excitement of ham radio. Others enjoy talking to people across the country and around the globe, participating in local contests and building experiments. The ARRL Ham Radio License Manual will guide you as you get started in the hobby–as you select your equipment, set-up your first station and make your first contact. Use this book to study for your license exam. Morse code is not required for this license. With a Technician Class license, you will have all ham radio privileges above 30 MHz. These privileges include the very popular 2-meter band. Many Technician licensees enjoy using small (2 meter) hand-held radios to stay in touch with other hams in their area.   This book is for newly licensed amateur radio operators looking for some guidance as to what they can do with their amateur radio license. It lists 21 specific activities that will not only make them better amateur radio operators, but help them have more fun with amateur radio.4/4(1).

your license. I hope that, by helping you get your license, this guide will encourage you to become an active radio amateur and get on the air, participate in public service and emergency communications, join an amateur radio club, and experiment with radios, antennas, and circuits. Tese are the activities that will. ARRL, the national association for Amateur Radio Main Street Newington, CT, USA Tel Fax Toll-free [email protected] Contact ARRL The ARRL is a member-society and International Secretariat of the . Computer hobbyists enjoy using Amateur Radio's digital communications opportunities. Others compete in "DX contests," where the object is to see how many hams in distant locations they can contact. Mostly we use ham radio to form friendships over the air or through participation in one of more than Amateur Radio clubs throughout the country. But first, let’s see how to get your ham radio license from the FCC. FCC Licensing: To become a ham radio operator you must obtain a license from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC is the federal governing body overseeing the Amateur Radio Service, known colloquially as ham radio.