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Literature and the philosophy of intention

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Published by Macmillan, St. Martin"s Press in Basingstoke, Hampshire [England], New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • English literature -- History and criticism -- Theory, etc.,
  • Literature -- Philosophy.,
  • Intention (Logic)

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 250-251) and index.

StatementPatrick Swinden.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR21 .S95 1999
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii, 255 p. ;
Number of Pages255
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL378316M
ISBN 100312219636, 0333734998
LC Control Number98040373

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About this book Introduction It enlists the aid of Kantian aesthetics and contemporary philosophy of language and action, as well as studying the play on intention in the manipulation of character and action in the work of Shakespeare and other English writers from to the present day.   Description. This book attempts to reinstate the importance of authorial intention by examining arguments against it from a variety of sources - American New Criticism, European Structuralism and various kinds of postmodernist theory. It enlists the aid of Kantian aesthetics and contemporary philosophy of language and action, as well as studying Author: Patrick Swinden. Intentions combines recent work in philosophy, literary criticism, hermeneutics, and rhetoric in a highly imaginative way to construct a theory of intention for a postmodern rhetoric. It recovers and renovates central concepts in rhetorical theory—not only intention but also deliberation, politics, and by: 3. Intentionality, in modern literary theory, the study of authorial intention in a literary work and its corresponding relevance to textual interpretation.

Thirteen essays discuss the role of appeals to the author's intention in interpreting works of literature. A well-known argument by E.D. Hirsch serves as the basic text, in which he defends the appeal to the author's intention against Wimsatt and Beardsley's claim that . Buy Literature and the Philosophy of Intention 1st ed. by Swinden, Patrick (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Patrick Swinden. G. E. M. Anscombe’s Intention is a classic of twentieth-century philosophy. The work has been enormously influential despite being a dense and largely misunderstood text. It is a standard reference point for anyone engaging with philosophy of action and philosophy of psychology.   John Maynard’s Literary Intention is a comprehensive work of intellectual history that investigates the concepts and theories that once animated intense debates about intentionality, reception-aesthetics, and ideology-critique. At the same time, it locates the reasons why critics began to weave cultural tapestries around texts instead of interpreting them.

  In the middle of the 20th century literary criticism was very dependent on the concept of author intention, the notion that the meaning of a literary work was found in the author's view of it, either when it was written or later. This view suggested that authorial intent is paramount in the interpretation of a work's meaning. To what extent can a text itself be said to be 'intentional'? The aim of this book is to provide an in-depth analysis and critique of this concept of intention, its uses within the realms of literary theory, aesthetics, philosophy of language, phenomenology and deconstruction, and its potential for redefinition. An in-depth analysis and critique of the concept of intention, its uses within the realms of literary theory, aesthetics, philosophy of language, phenomenology and deconstruction, and its potential for redefinition. Intentionality is a philosophical concept defined as "the power of minds to be about, to represent, or to stand for, things, properties and states of affairs". The idea fell out of discussion with the end of the medieval scholastic period, but in recent times was resurrected by empirical psychologist Franz Brentano and later adopted by contemporary phenomenological philosopher Edmund Husserl.